Jesus Christ – Christian Warrior


Jesus also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus Christ, is the central figure of Christianity, whom the teachings of most Christian denominations hold to be the Son of God. Christians believe Jesus is the awaited Messiah (or Christ, the Anointed One) of the Old Testament.

Christians believe that Jesus has a “unique significance” in the world. Christian doctrines include the beliefs that Jesus was conceived by the Holy Spirit, was born of a virgin named Mary, performed miracles, founded the Church, died by crucifixion as a sacrifice to achieve atonement, rose from the dead, and ascended into Heaven, whence he will return. Most Christians believe Jesus enables humans to be reconciled to God. The Nicene Creed asserts that Jesus will judge the dead either before or after their bodily resurrection, an event tied to the Second Coming of Jesus in Christian eschatology; though some believe Jesus’s role as savior has more existential or societal concerns than the afterlife, and a few notable theologians have suggested that Jesus will bring about a universal reconciliation. The great majority of Christians worship Jesus as the incarnation of God the Son, the second of three persons of a Divine Trinity. A minority of Christian denominations reject Trinitarianism, wholly or partly, as non-scriptural.

1. In Islam, Jesus is considered one of God’s important prophets and the Messiah.
According to Muslims, Jesus was a bringer of scripture and was born of a virgin but was not the Son of God. To most
Muslims, Jesus was not crucified but was physically raised into Heaven by God.Judaism rejects the belief that Jesus was the awaited Messiah, arguing that his death on the cross signifies that he was rejected by God and that his resurrection is a Christian legend.

2.Early life, family, and profession
12-year-old Jesus found in the temple depicted by James Tissot Jesus’ childhood home is identified in the gospels of Luke and Matthew as the town of Nazareth in Galilee where he lived with his family. Although Joseph appears in descriptions of Jesus’ childhood, no mention is made of him thereafter. His other family members—his mother, Mary, his brothers James, Joses (or Joseph), Judas and Simon and his unnamed sisters—are mentioned in the gospels and other sources.

According to Stephen L. Harris, Gospel of Mark says that Jesus comes into conflict with his neighbors and family.Jesus’ mother and brothers come to get him because people are saying that he’s crazy. Jesus responds that his followers are his true family. In John, Mary follows Jesus to his crucifixion, and he expresses concern over her well-being .

Jesus is called a tekton in Mark 6:3, traditionally understood as carpenter but could cover makers of objects in various materials, including builders. The gospels indicate that Jesus could read, paraphrase, and debate scripture, but this does not necessarily mean that he received formal scribal training.

3.Baptism and temptation
Trevisani’s depiction of the baptism of Jesus, with the Holy Spirit descending from Heaven as a dove The Synoptic accounts of Jesus’ baptism are all preceded by information about John the Baptist. They show John preaching penance and repentance for the remission of sins and encouraging the giving of alms to the poor as he baptizes people in the area of the River Jordan around Perea and foretells the arrival of someone “more powerful” than he. Later, Jesus identifies John as “the Elijah who was to come”, the prophet who was expected to arrive before the “great and terrible day of the Lord” . Likewise, Luke says that John had the spirit and power of Elijah .

In Mark, John baptizes Jesus, and as he comes out of the water he see the Holy Spirit descending to him like a dove and he hears a voice from heaven declaring him to be God’s son . This is one of two events described in the gospels where a voice from Heaven calls Jesus “Son”, the other being the Transfiguration. The spirit then drives him into the wilderness where he is tempted by Satan. Jesus then begins his ministry after John’s arrest . Jesus’ baptism in Matthew is similar. Here, before Jesus’ baptism, John protests, saying, “I need to be baptized by you”. Jesus instructs him to carry on with the baptism “to fulfill all righteousness” (Matthew 3:15). Matthew also details the three temptations that Satan offers Jesus in the wilderness (Matthew 4:3–11). In Luke, the Holy Spirit descends as a dove after everyone has been baptized and Jesus is praying (Luke 3:21-22). John implicitly recognizes Jesus from prison after sending his followers to ask about him (Luke 7:18–23). Jesus’ baptism and temptation serve as preparation for his public ministry.

The Gospel of John leaves out Jesus’ baptism and temptation. Here, John the Baptist testifies that he saw the Spirit descend on Jesus (John 1:32).John publicly proclaims Jesus as the sacrificial Lamb of God, and some of John’s
followers become disciples of Jesus. In this Gospel, John denies that he is Elijah (John 1:21). Before John is imprisoned, Jesus leads his followers to baptize disciples as well (John 3:22-24), and they baptize more people than John (John 4:1).

4.Disciples and followers
Jesus talking to his 12 disciples, as depicted by James Tissot Near the beginning of his ministry, Jesus appoints twelve apostles. In Matthew and Mark, despite Jesus only briefly requesting that they join him, Jesus’ first four apostles, who were fishermen, are described as immediately consenting, and abandoning their nets and boats to do so (Matthew 4:18–22, Mark 1:16–20). In John, Jesus’ first two apostles were disciples of John the Baptist. The Baptist sees Jesus and calls him the Lamb of God; the two hear this and follow Jesus. In addition to the Twelve Apostles, the opening of the passage of the Sermon on the Plain identifies a much larger group of people as disciples (Luke 6:17). Also, in Luke 10:1– 16 Jesus sends seventy or seventy-two of his followers in pairs to prepare towns for his prospective visit. They are instructed to accept hospitality, heal the sick and spread the word that the Kingdom of God is coming.

In Mark, the disciples are notably obtuse. They fail to understand Jesus’ miracles (Mark 4:35–41, 6:52), his parables (Mark 4:13), or what “rising from the dead” would mean (Mark 9:9–10). When Jesus is later arrested, they desert him.

5.Teachings, preachings, and miracles
Christ and the Rich Young Ruler by Heinrich Hofmann, 1889In the Synoptics, Jesus teaches extensively, often in parables, about the Kingdom of God (or, in Matthew, the Kingdom of Heaven). The Kingdom is described as both imminent (Mark 1:15) and already present in the ministry of Jesus (Luke 17:21). Jesus promises inclusion in the Kingdom for those who accept his message (Mark 10:13–27). Jesus talks of the “Son of Man,” an apocalyptic figure who would come to gather the chosen.

Jesus calls people to repent their sins and to devote themselves completely to God. Jesus tells his followers to adhere strictly to Jewish law, although he is perceived by some to have broken the law himself, for example regarding the Sabbath. When asked what the greatest commandment is, Jesus replies: “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind … And a second is like it: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself” (Matthew 22:37–39). Other ethical teachings of Jesus include loving one’s enemies, refraining from hatred and lust, and turning the other cheek (Matthew 5:21–44).

John’s Gospel presents the teachings of Jesus not merely as his own preaching, but as divine revelation. John the Baptist, for example, states in John 3:34: “He whom God has sent speaks the words of God, for he gives the Spirit without measure.” In John 7:16 Jesus says, “My teaching is not mine but his who sent me.” He asserts the same thing in John 14:10: “Do you not believe that I am in the Father and the Father is in me? The words that I say to you I do not speak on my own; but the Father who dwells in me does his works.”

Jesus, his head surrounded by a halo, puts his hands on a leper, thereby healing him.Jesus cleansing a leper – medieval mosaic from the Monreale Cathedral.In the gospels, the approximately thirty parables form about one third of Jesus’ recorded teachings. The parables appear within longer sermons and at other places in the narrative.They often contain symbolism, and usually relate the physical world to the spiritual. Common themes in these tales include the kindness and generosity of God and the perils of transgression. Some of his parables, such as the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11–32), are relatively simple, while others, such as the Growing Seed (Mark 4:26–29), are sophisticated, profound and abstruse.

In the gospel accounts, Jesus devotes a large portion of his ministry performing miracles, especially healings. The miracles can be classified into two main categories: healing miracles and nature miracles. The healing miracles include cures for physical ailments, exorcisms, and resurrections of the dead. The nature miracles show Jesus’ power
over nature, and include turning water into wine, walking on water, and calming a storm, among others. Jesus states that his miracles are from a divine source. When Jesus’ opponents suddenly accuse him of performing exorcisms by the power of Beelzebul, the prince of demons, Jesus counters that he performs them by the “Spirit of God” (Matthew 12:28) or “finger of God”, arguing that all logic suggests that Satan would not let his demons assist the Children of God because it would divide Satan’s house and bring his kingdom to desolation; furthermore, he asks his opponents that if he exorcises by Beel’zebub, “by whom do your sons cast them out?”(Luke 11:20). In Matthew 12:31-32, he goes on to say that while all manner of sin, “even insults against God” or “insults against the son of man”, shall be forgiven, whoever insults goodness (or “The Holy Spirit”) shall never be forgiven; he/she carries the guilt of his/her sin forever.

In John, Jesus’ miracles are described as “signs”, performed to prove his mission and divinity. However, in the Synoptics, when asked to give miraculous signs to prove his authority, Jesus refuses. Also, in the Synoptic Gospels, the crowds regularly respond to Jesus’ miracles with awe and press on him to heal their sick. In John’s Gospel, Jesus is presented as unpressured by the crowds, who often respond to his miracles with trust and faith. One characteristic
shared among all miracles of Jesus in the gospel accounts is that he performed them freely and never requested or accepted any form of payment. The gospel episodes that include descriptions of the miracles of Jesus also often include teachings, and the miracles themselves involve an element of teaching. Many of the miracles teach the importance of faith. In the cleansing of ten lepers and the raising of Jairus’ daughter, for instance, the beneficiaries are told that their healing was due to their faith.

6.Agony in the Garden, betrayal and arrest
Judas kisses Jesus, and soldiers rush to seize the latter.A 17th-century depiction of the kiss of Judas and arrest of Jesus, by Caravaggio .After the Last Supper, Jesus takes a walk to pray, and then meryJudas and the authorities come and arrest him.In Mark, they go to the garden of Gethsemane, where Jesus prays to be spared his coming ordeal. His disciples fall asleep while they should be watching (Mark 37–41). Then Judas comes with an armed mob, sent by the chief priests, scribes and elders. He kisses Jesus to identify him to the crowd, which then arrests Jesus. In an attempt to stop them, one of Jesus’ disciples uses a sword to cut off the ear of a man in the crowd. After Jesus’ arrest, his disciples go into hiding, and Peter, when questioned, thrice denies knowing Jesus. After the third denial, he hears the rooster crow and recalls the prediction as Jesus turns to look at him. Peter then weeps bitterly.In Matthew, Jesus criticizes the disciple’s attack with the sword, enjoining his disciples not to resist his arrest. He says, “All who take the sword will perish by the sword” (Matthew 26:52).In Luke, Jesus goes to the Mount of Olives to pray, and Jesus miraculously heals the ear that a disciple severed (Luke 22:51).In John, Jesus does not pray to be spared his crucifixion, as the gospel portrays him as scarcely touched by such human weakness. The people who arrest him are soldiers and Jewish officers (John 18:3). Instead of being betrayed by a kiss, Jesus proclaims his identity, and when he does, the soldiers and officers fall to the ground (John 18:4–7). The gospel identifies Peter as the disciple who used the sword, and Jesus rebukes him for it (John 18:10–11).

7.Trials by the Sanhedrin, Herod and Pilate
What is truth?; and Ecce homo After his arrest, Jesus is taken to the Sanhedrin, a Jewish judicial body.The gospel accounts differ on the details of the trials. In Matthew 26:57, Mark 14:53 and Luke 22:54, Jesus is taken to the house of the high priest, Caiaphas, where he is mocked and beaten that night. Early the next morning, the chief priests and scribes lead Jesus away into their council. John 18:12–14 states that Jesus is first taken to Annas, Caiaphas’ father-in-law, and then to the high priest.

8.A depiction of Jesus’ public trial
Ecce homo! Antonio Ciseri’s 1871 depiction of Pontius Pilate presenting Jesus to the public During the trials Jesus speaks very little, mounts no defense, and gives very infrequent and indirect answers to the priests’ questions, prompting an officer to slap him. In Matthew 26:62 Jesus’ unresponsiveness leads Caiaphas to ask him, “Have you no answer?” In Mark 14:61 the high priest then asks Jesus, “Are you the Messiah, the Son of the Blessed One?” Jesus replies, “I am”, and then predicts the coming of the Son of Man. This provokes Caiaphas to tear his own robe in anger and to accuse Jesus of blasphemy. In Matthew and Luke, Jesus’ answer is more ambiguous: in Matthew 26:64 he responds, “You have said so”, and in Luke 22:70 he says, “You say that I am”.

They take Jesus to Pilate’s Court, but Pilate proves extremely reluctant to condemn Jesus; according to Robert W. Funk, it is the Jewish elders who are to blame for Jesus’ crucifixion. Augustine of Hippo says that Pilate was not free from blame, since he exercised his power to execute Jesus. The Jewish elders ask the Roman governor Pontius Pilate to judge and condemn Jesus, accusing him of claiming to be the King of the Jews. The use of the word “king” is central to the discussion between Jesus and Pilate. In John 18:36 Jesus states, “My kingdom is not from this world”, but he does not unequivocally deny being the King of the Jews. In Luke 23:7–15 Pilate realizes that Jesus is a Galilean, and thus comes under the jurisdiction of Herod Antipas. Pilate sends Jesus to Herod to be tried, but Jesus says almost nothing in response to Herod’s questions. Herod and his soldiers mock Jesus, put an expensive robe on him to make him look like a king, and return him to Pilate, who then calls together the Jewish elders and announces that he has “not found this man guilty”.

Observing a Passover custom of the time, Pilate allows one prisoner chosen by the crowd to be released. He gives the people a choice between Jesus and a murderer called Barabbas. Persuaded by the elders (Matthew 27:20), the mob chooses to release Barabbas and crucify Jesus. Pilate writes a sign in Hebrew, Latin, and Greek that reads “Jesus of Nazareth, the King of the Jews” (abbreviated as INRI in depictions) to be affixed to Jesus’ cross (John 19:19–20), then courges Jesus and sends him to be crucified. The soldiers place a Crown of Thorns on Jesus’ head and ridicule him as the King of the Jews. They beat and taunt him before taking him to Calvary, also called Golgotha, for crucifixion.

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